Faces of Adaptation: Meet NW CASC’s Tribal Liaison

Chas Jones serves as the NW CASC Tribal Resilience Liaison through the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI). In this role, Chas works to build relationships with Northwest tribes and tribal staff and understand their climate-related concerns. By understanding specific concerns of a tribe or tribal department, he is able to connect tribes with opportunities for funding or partnerships that can support tribes in building capacity and addressing specific climate impacts. Chas also provides support for climate vulnerability assessment and adaptation planning to tribal governments.

Chas is one of several Tribal Resilience Liaisons within the Climate Adaptation Science Center network. These Tribal Resilience Liaisons are supported by a unique partnership between the Climate Adaptation Science Centers, the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ Tribal Resilience Program and tribal organization partners. The network works with Tribes to achieve their Tribal priorities by connecting them to information, data, resources and expertise that facilitates culturally appropriate research and planning.

Chas has an interdisciplinary background studying the relationships between climate, water, ecology, and society. His PhD and postdoctoral research focused on climate change impacts on hydrologic systems in Alaska, where he first began incorporating traditional knowledge and science to assess exposure of indigenous people to the impacts of climate change. Chas has also worked as an environmental consultant in the southwestern US, examining riparian restoration plans to benefit endangered species. Throughout these experiences, he worked to foster communicative and beneficial interactions between tribal nations and government institutions, which he says contributes greatly to his role as the Tribal Liaison for ATNI.

Read about one of Chas’s experiences in his role as Tribal Liaison!

Power Paddle to Puyallup, 2018. Large tribal canoes rest above high tide adorned with boughs of cedar and painted tribal symbols after being carried by up to 50 volunteers. The canoes weigh up to 2000 lbs. and are sometimes greater than 60 feet in length.
Power Paddle to Puyallup, 2018. Large tribal canoes rest above high tide adorned with boughs of cedar and painted tribal symbols after being carried by up to 50 volunteers. The canoes weigh up to 2000 lbs. and are sometimes greater than 60 feet in length.
Source: Chas Jones