Actionable Science Webinars

Upcoming Fall 2018 Skills-building Webinars: Social Science Tools for Making Science Actionable

These webinars will provide brief introductions to important social science issues and considerations, and describe resources for further learning.

Explore upcoming webinars and register today by clicking the links below

  • Friday Harbor Labs books

    Considering Research Ethics and Design for Participatory Research Projects

    September 25, 2018

    This webinar will introduce participants to ethical and research design considerations in collaborative research projects, including the links between ethics and design. We will discuss ways in which to consider the needs of stakeholders for both usable research outputs and fair and equitable participation in the research process.

    PRESENTER:
    Alison M. Meadow | Research Scientist, University of Arizona - Institute of the Environment
    Dr. Meadow has a background in Environmental Anthropology. Her research focuses on the process of linking scientists with decision makers to improve the usability of climate science. She also works on several interdisciplinary teams focused on helping natural resource, cultural resource, and emergency managers.


    Considering Research Ethics and Design for Participatory Research Projects from NW CASC on Vimeo.

  • UW Environmental Science North Cascades Group Field Trip

    Using Interviews and Surveys to Strengthen Research Partnerships

    October 16, 2018

    This webinar will provide practical guidance on how to design survey and interview questions for use in participatory research projects.

    PRESENTERS:
    Alison M. Meadow | Research Scientist, University of Arizona - Institute of the Environment
    Dr. Meadow has a background in Environmental Anthropology. Her research focuses on the process of linking scientists with decision makers to improve the usability of climate science. She also works on several interdisciplinary teams focused on helping natural resource, cultural resource, and emergency managers.

    Gigi Owen | Research Scientist, University of Arizona - Institute of the Environment and CLIMAS
    Gigi Owen is a social scientist for the Climate Assessment for the Southwest. Her research interests center on connections and interactions between humans and their environments. Gigi is also a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona.


    Using Interviews and Surveys to Strengthen Research Partnerships from NW CASC on Vimeo.


  • UW Cascades field trip

    Understanding Organizations Using Ethnographic Field Methods

    November 13, 2018

    This webinar will introduce ethnographic research methods that can be used within participatory research projects to deepen researchers’ understandings of stakeholders’ decision-making contexts and organization’s structures.

    PRESENTERS:
    Alison M. Meadow | Research Scientist, University of Arizona - Institute of the Environment
    Dr. Meadow has a background in Environmental Anthropology. Her research focuses on the process of linking scientists with decision makers to improve the usability of climate science. She also works on several interdisciplinary teams focused on helping natural resource, cultural resource, and emergency managers.

    Gigi Owen | Research Scientist, University of Arizona - Institute of the Environment and CLIMAS
    Gigi Owen is a social scientist for the Climate Assessment for the Southwest. Her research interests center on connections and interactions between humans and their environments. Gigi is also a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona.
    Register Here
  • Meeting Supplies

    Qualitative Data: Understanding and Using Interview, Survey Observational Data

    December 11, 2018

    This webinar will introduce participants to data analysis techniques specific to qualitative data from interviews, focus groups, and field notes. We will also address some of the challenges and benefits of integrating qualitative and quantitative data within one project.

    PRESENTERS:
    Alison M. Meadow |Research Scientist, University of Arizona - Institute of the Environment
    Dr. Meadow has a background in Environmental Anthropology. Her research focuses on the process of linking scientists with decision makers to improve the usability of climate science. She also works on several interdisciplinary teams focused on helping natural resource, cultural resource, and emergency managers.

    Gigi Owen | Research Scientist, University of Arizona - Institute of the Environment and CLIMAS
    Gigi Owen is a social scientist for the Climate Assessment for the Southwest. Her research interests center on connections and interactions between humans and their environments. Gigi is also a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona.

    Ben McMahan| Research Scientist, University of Arizona - Institute of the Environment, CLIMAS and Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology
    Dr. McMahan has a background in Sociocultural Anthropology. At CLIMAS, his research focuses on how climate information is incorporated into regional decision maker networks, the risks and effects of climate extremes, and the effects of climate variability on phenology and temporality of native plants in the region. Ben also works on developing collaborative research opportunities and outreach at CLIMAS.
    Register Here


 

 

Actionable Science Skills-building Webinar Series

This webinar series was designed to help those engaged in climate science research better understand the range of approaches for developing actionable science. Each webinar explores ways to support effective collaborations between scientific researchers and natural resource managers.

View the recordings below to learn about actionable science topics 

  • When recording data on a fish, crew members collect them in nets and place them into buckets to record their length, weight and species.

    Developing a Successful Co-production Collaboration between Scientists and Practitioners

    Assessing and addressing climate risks will require rigorous science that is both useful to and used by decision-makers. Research has shown that such “actionable science” is most likely to be generated through “co-production” – the process of scientists working closely with decision-makers to identify key questions, design research approaches, conduct research, and communicate findings in such a way as to develop information, tools, and knowledge that solve real-world problems. This webinar is intended to help scientists and natural resource management professionals better understand the processes, skills, and outcomes associated with effective co-production of actionable climate science.

    Presenters:
    Meade Krosby | Deputy University Director, NW Climate Science Center & Senior Research Scientist, Climate Impacts Group at University of Washington

    Dr. Krosby’s professional mission is to promote effective biodiversity conservation under climate change by collaboratively conducting innovative, rigorous, and useful assessments of climate impacts and adaptation responses for species and ecosystems.

    Amy Snover | University Director, NW Climate Science Center & Director, Climate Impacts Group at University of Washington

    Dr. Snover works to connect science and decision-making to tackle today's pressing environmental challenges. Specifically, she aims to support the development of regional resilience to climate variability and change by harnessing science to address the real needs of resource managers, planners, and policymakers.


    Developing a Successful Co-production Collaboration between Scientists and Practitioners from NW CASC on Vimeo.


  • In-situ temperature sensors were installed in the stream at ten sites along the North Fork Stillaguamish and it's tributaries

    An Introduction to Collaborative Research Methods

    Collaborative research is a unique approach to research in which the end-users of the findings (stakeholders) are actively involved in the process of research. Through collaboration, our stakeholders feel greater ownership over the research and are more likely to use it to take action. Collaborative research requires a particular set of research approaches and methods that allow it to be both scientific rigorous and highly relevant to real-world actors. This webinar introduces the principles of collaborative research and demonstrate several activities researchers can use to make their work more collaborative and impactful.

    Presenter:
    Alison Meadow | Research Scientist, Institute of the Environment at University of Arizona

    Dr. Meadow has a background in Environmental Anthropology. Her research focuses on the process of linking scientists with decision makers to improve the usability of climate science. She also works on several interdisciplinary teams focused on helping natural resource, cultural resource, and emergency managers.


    An Introduction to Collaborative Research Methods from NW CASC on Vimeo.


  • David Diaz works with a family forest owner to map his property using the Forest Planner web application

    The Role of Communication in Knowledge Co-Production

    Researchers and practitioners involved in knowledge co-production each use their own specialized language. An important part of successful knowledge co-production involves establishing shared terms of references. Communicating effectively and developing the ability to distill complex topics into clear, vivid, and understandable language is challenging. This webinar explores the role of communication in the process of knowledge co-production and will share some communication best practices that participants can apply in their work.

    Presenters:
    Heidi Roop | Research Scientist & Strategic Communications Lead, Climate Impacts Group at University of Washington

    Dr. Heidi Roop is an expert in science communication, stakeholder engagement, and assessment and evaluation. Heidi's professional mission is to improve the reach and impact of climate science in order to engage, motivate and catalyze action around climate change. Heidi aspires to be a scientist who changes how the world engages in science, with scientists.

    Darcy Widmayer | Communications Manager, NW Climate Science Center at University of Washington

    Darcy Widmayer has experience in strategic communications planning, message development, project coordination, and program evaluation. She previously worked for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) as a Private Forestry Education and Outreach Specialist facilitating communications between private landowners and state foresters.


    The Role of Communication in Knowledge Co-production from NW CASC on Vimeo.


  • Pintails in the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge

    Best Practices for Collaborative Climate Adaptation Research Between Tribal and Non-tribal Partners

    This webinar provides an introduction to key considerations and best practices associated with conducting climate adaptation research in partnership with tribal communities. Topics include tribal sovereignty and government-to-government relations, the importance of community involvement and capacity-building, and the use and protection of indigenous knowledges.

    Presenters:
    Chas Jones |Tribal Liaison, with the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians & NW Climate Science Center at United States Geological Survey

    Dr. Jones is an interdisciplinary expert in the dynamic interactions between climate, water, ecology, and society. He serves a key role in the delivery of climate change-related services to the tribal community in the Northwest, consistent with the objectives of the NW CSC Tribal Engagement Strategy.

    Amelia Marchand | Water Regulatory Specialist, Environmental Trust Department at Confederated Tribes of Colville Reservation

    An enrolled citizen of the Colville Tribes, Amelia’s heritage is Okanogan, Moses-Columbia, Arrow Lakes, Palus and Chief Joseph Band of Nez Perce. Her work includes environmental regulation of land use and development permits, advising on climate change mitigation and adaptation initiatives, facilitating public involvement in review processes, and education outreach on climate, food, and environmental justice.


    Best Practices for Collaborative Climate Adaptation Research between Tribal and Non-tribal Partners from NW CASC on Vimeo.



 

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