Actionable Science Webinars

The Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center (NW CASC) offers both skills-building webinar series and individual applied science webinars.

Skills-Building Webinar Series

Our skills-building webinar series are designed to promote a deeper understanding of actionable science approaches by emphasizing the process behind effective engagement between research and management communities.

Amplifying Actionable Science through Intentional, Integrated and Creative Communications

Click on the expanding tiles below to view recordings of completed webinars and to register for upcoming webinars.

  • Aerial view of a curved mountain road nestled among a dense forest

    Communication as an Essential Ingredient for Actionable Science: Key Concepts, Practical Strategies and Innovative Examples from the Northwest

    October 1, 2019 | 11:00 AM (PT)

    Engaging scientists and decision-makers in the co-production of knowledge is considered a best practice for generating science that is likely to be useful and used in addressing pressing environmental challenges. Effective, ongoing communication is vital to the success of this highly collaborative research approach, from a project’s inception through dissemination of results (and beyond!). In this webinar, Dr. Meade Krosby will introduce key concepts for understanding the role of communication in the co-production of actionable science, and will offer practical strategies for integrating communication approaches across the life cycle of co-production efforts. Dr. Krosby will illustrate these concepts and strategies by highlighting innovative examples from the Northwest, describing key communication elements across the project process and presenting a wide range of co-created products – from interactive tools and trainings to community outreach materials and strategic media engagements.

    PRESENTER:
    Meade Krosby | Deputy University Director, Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center & Senior Scientist, University of Washington Climate Impacts Group

  • Fluffy clouds in a bright blue sky cast shadows on dry, golden-yellow hills

    Better Stories, Bigger Impact: How Scientists Can Engage Effectively with the Media to Share Their Science

    November 5, 2019 | 11:00 AM (PT)

    More than ever, scientists are being asked to explain how their research is relevant to society and decision-making. This often requires them to navigate interactions with the media. In this webinar, journalist and scientist Dr. Julia Rosen will share expertise and insights about how scientists can more effectively engage with journalists to share compelling stories about their research. This webinar will provide practical lessons for successfully working with the media to increase the reach and impact of your science and will explore questions including: How do you build trust with journalists? At what point in the research process should you engage with journalists? What are best practices for communicating with the media?

    PRESENTER:
    Julia Rosen | Science Reporter, Los Angeles Times
    Julia Rosen is a science reporter for the Los Angeles Times writing from Portland, Oregon. She became a journalist after getting her doctorate in geology and was an AAAS Mass Media Fellow at The Times in 2014. After that, she worked as a freelancer, covering earth and environmental science, and what happens when science and society collide. Her writing has appeared in Nature, Science, High Country News, National Geographic and many other publications.

    Register Here

  • View of pebbles under the clear water of a mountain lake with snow-capped peaks and trees in the background

    What Can Successful Communication Look Like in Actionable Science? Examples from the Climate Adaptation Science Centers

    December 3, 2019 | 11:00 AM (PT)

    While the peer-reviewed publication is the mainstay of academic science communication, science that is co-produced with decision-makers to help address environmental challenges often demands products that look quite different. While a peer-reviewed publication may in fact be a vital outcome of such work, so too may be specialized reports, tools, trainings, and a diverse suite of other products. So what can such products look like and how are they developed? In this webinar, presenters from across the Climate Adaptation Science Centers (a national network of federal-academic partnerships designed to facilitate the production of actionable climate adaptation science) will share a suite of creative products used to communicate collaborative research and inform decision-making, highlighting both the products and the processes used to collaboratively develop them.

    PRESENTERS:
    Emily Fort | Communications, Data and Information Technology Coordinator, National Climate Adaptation Science Center
    Kristin Timm | PhD Candidate and Graduate Researcher, George Mason University

    Additional speakers TBD

    Register Here

 

Co-Production in Practice: Examples from the Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center

This webinar series is designed to illustrate the process of co-production using examples from a wide range of projects funded by the Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center. Each webinar provides practices and lessons learned for those wanting to take a co-production approach to generating actionable science to inform decision-making in a changing climate.

Click on the expanding tiles below to view recordings of this series.

  • Yarrow plant

    Co-Producing Tribal Resources for Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment

    Tribes are actively engaged in efforts to anticipate and respond to climate impacts on tribal natural and cultural resources. And yet, some tribes have faced difficulties initiating and completing the critical first step of the climate adaptation planning process: an assessment of locally-specific climate risks that accounts for the unique priorities, values, and concerns of individual tribes. The University of Washington Climate Impacts Group worked in close collaboration with tribal partners to develop a suite of resources aimed at building the capacity of Northwest and Great Basin tribes to evaluate climate risks to natural and cultural resources.

    This webinar will describe the collaborative process employed by project partners to ensure these resources would be useful and used by tribes. It will also describe efforts to observe best practices in partnering with tribes. This webinar is designed to offer useful practices and lessons learned to inform similar climate adaptation efforts with tribes and other communities.

    PRESENTER:
    Meade Krosby | Deputy University Director, Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center & Senior Scientist, University of Washington Climate Impacts Group

  • Bull trout with westslope cutthroat in the background, Middle Fork. Flathead tributary, Montana

    Knowledge to Action: The Role of Social Drivers in the Recovery of Bull Trout in a Changing Climate

    As a species dependent on cold water habitat, bull trout are especially vulnerable to warming stream temperatures under a changing climate. The science of bull trout’s climate vulnerability is well-established, but how does this information translate into action on the ground to help conserve this threatened species?  In this webinar, Dr. Jason Dunham from the U.S. Geological Survey will discuss his experience working at regional and local scales to engage stakeholders in decision-making around bull trout recovery, tracing the journey from knowledge to action. Experience with bull trout management shows that a lack of consideration of social drivers typically leads to a lack of actionable outcomes. Arguably, in many cases, ecological information is less important unless social drivers are effectively addressed and given equal or greater attention in the process of climate adaptation. This webinar will emphasize the social processes important for incorporating ecological considerations in management decisions.

    PRESENTER:
    Jason Dunham | Aquatic Ecologist, U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center


  • Field work at Swanson Lakes Wildlife Area, Lincoln County, WA

    Co-Producing Science to Inform Sea-Level Rise Vulnerability and Adaptation for Wetlands

    In this webinar, Dr. Thorne will present coastal climate adaptation case studies and lessons learned from multiple years working closely with resource managers. Dr. Thorne and her partners use both formal and informal methods to facilitate co-production, communication and outreach on sea-level rise research, and to translate science to inform management actions. This has included convening managers, biologists, Tribes, and other decision-makers and partners at regional workshops for structured scenario and adaptation planning. Through her work, Dr. Thorne has found that building trusting relationships with end-users early in the research process is the most effective way to ensure that science can inform on-the-ground actions. A strong manager-science partnership can benefit all participants by generating important research questions, collecting relevant data and translating research for end-users.

    PRESENTER:
    Karen Thorne | Principal Investigator, U.S. Geological Survey Western Ecological Research Center

  • Black plumes of smoke engulf a forest ridge during the Pioneer Fire in Boise National Forest, Idaho, 2016

    Convening Multiple Interests on a Hot Topic: Western Washington Wildfire Deep Dive Event

    As our climate changes, there is an increasing need for collaboration across sectors to prepare for climate change impacts on people and ecosystems. But how do you bring together diverse parties with different areas of expertise, terminology and ways of approaching an issue? How do you ensure that diverse interests are included in the discussion about climate impacts and adaptation actions?

    This webinar will describe the process used to bring together diverse perspectives for a Deep Dive event on Managing Western Washington Wildfire Risk in a Changing Climate. This collaboratively-designed event brought together a range of concerned parties including emergency managers, local government planners, natural resource managers, scientists and public health experts, who represent different interests and actions in the path towards wildfire preparedness. This event was held in December 2018 and was organized by the Puget Sound Climate Preparedness Collaborative, the Tulalip Tribes, the Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center and the University of Washington Climate Impacts Group.

    PRESENTER:
    Crystal Raymond | Climate Adaptation Specialist, University of Washington Climate Impacts Group



 

Social Science Tools for Making Science Actionable  

This webinar series is designed to provide brief introductions to important social science issues and considerations and describe resources for further learning.

Click on the expanding tiles below to view recordings of this series.

  • Friday Harbor Labs books

    Considering Research Ethics and Design for Participatory Research Projects

    This webinar introduces participants to ethical and research design considerations in collaborative research projects, including the links between ethics and design. It discusses ways in which to consider the needs of stakeholders for both usable research outputs and fair and equitable participation in the research process.

    PRESENTER:
    Alison M. Meadow | Research Scientist, University of Arizona – Institute of the Environment

  • UW Environmental Science North Cascades Group Field Trip

    Using Interviews and Surveys to Strengthen Research Partnerships

    This webinar provides practical guidance on how to design survey and interview questions for use in participatory research projects.

    PRESENTERS:
    Alison M. Meadow | Research Scientist, University of Arizona – Institute of the Environment
    Gigi Owen | Research Scientist, University of Arizona – Institute of the Environment and CLIMAS


  • UW Cascades field trip

    Understanding Organizations Using Ethnographic Field Methods

    This webinar introduces ethnographic research methods that can be used within participatory research projects to deepen researchers’ understanding of stakeholders’ decision-making contexts and organization structures.

    PRESENTERS:
    Alison M. Meadow | Research Scientist, University of Arizona – Institute of the Environment
    Gigi Owen | Research Scientist, University of Arizona – Institute of the Environment and CLIMAS

  • Meeting Supplies

    Analyzing Qualitative Data: Understanding and Using Interview, Survey Observational Data

    This webinar introduces participants to data analysis techniques specific to qualitative data from interviews, focus groups, and field notes. It also address some of the challenges and benefits of integrating qualitative and quantitative data within one project.

    PRESENTERS:
    Alison M. Meadow |Research Scientist, University of Arizona – Institute of the Environment
    Gigi Owen | Research Scientist, University of Arizona – Institute of the Environment and CLIMAS



 

An Introduction to Actionable Science 

This webinar series is designed to help those engaged in climate science research better understand the range of approaches for developing actionable science. Each webinar explores ways to support effective collaborations between scientific researchers and natural resource managers.

Click on the expanding tiles below to view recordings of this series.

  • View from Sammish Overlook

    Developing a Successful Co-production Collaboration between Scientists and Practitioners

    Assessing and addressing climate risks will require rigorous science that is both useful to and used by decision-makers. Research has shown that such “actionable science” is most likely to be generated through “co-production” – the process of scientists working closely with decision-makers to identify key questions, design research approaches, conduct research, and communicate findings in such a way as to develop information, tools, and knowledge that solve real-world problems. This webinar is intended to help scientists and natural resource management professionals better understand the processes, skills, and outcomes associated with effective co-production of actionable climate science.

    PRESENTERS:
    Meade Krosby | Deputy University Director, Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center & Senior Research Scientist, University of Washington Climate Impacts Group
    Amy Snover | University Director, Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center & Director, University of Washington Climate Impacts Group

  • In-situ temperature sensors were installed in the stream at ten sites along the North Fork Stillaguamish and it's tributaries

    An Introduction to Collaborative Research Methods

    Collaborative research is a unique approach to research in which the end-users of the findings (stakeholders) are actively involved in the process of research. Through collaboration, our stakeholders feel greater ownership over the research and are more likely to use it to take action. Collaborative research requires a particular set of research approaches and methods that allow it to be both scientific rigorous and highly relevant to real-world actors. This webinar introduces the principles of collaborative research and demonstrate several activities researchers can use to make their work more collaborative and impactful.

    PRESENTER:
    Alison Meadow | Research Scientist, Institute of the Environment at University of Arizona


  • David Diaz works with a family forest owner to map his property using the Forest Planner web application

    The Role of Communication in Knowledge Co-Production

    Researchers and practitioners involved in knowledge co-production each use their own specialized language. An important part of successful knowledge co-production involves establishing shared terms of references. Communicating effectively and developing the ability to distill complex topics into clear, vivid, and understandable language is challenging. This webinar explores the role of communication in the process of knowledge co-production and will share some communication best practices that participants can apply in their work.

    PRESENTERS:
    Heidi Roop | Lead Scientist for Science Communication, University of Washington Climate Impacts Group
    Darcy Widmayer | Communications Manager, Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center

  • Pintails in the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge

    Best Practices for Collaborative Climate Adaptation Research Between Tribal and Non-tribal Partners

    This webinar provides an introduction to key considerations and best practices associated with conducting climate adaptation research in partnership with tribal communities. Topics include tribal sovereignty and government-to-government relations, the importance of community involvement and capacity-building, and the use and protection of indigenous knowledges.

    PRESENTERS:
    Chas Jones | Tribal Liaison to the Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center, Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians
    Amelia Marchand | Water Regulatory Specialist, Environmental Trust Department at Confederated Tribes of Colville Reservation



 

Applied Science Webinars

Our individual applied science webinars cover a range of topics and lessons learned from NW CASC-funded projects.

Click on the expanding tiles below to view recordings of previous webinars.

  • Managing Western Washington Wildfire Risk in a Changing Climate

    In December 2018, multiple organizations came together with a shared interest in deepening the conversation about western Washington wildfire risk in a changing climate. The Puget Sound Climate Preparedness Collaborative, the Tulalip Tribes, the Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center and the University of Washington Climate Impacts Group co-convened an event, “Managing Western Washington Wildfire Risk in a Changing Climate”, to summarize the state of the science, share options to increase preparedness and identify barriers to acting. This workshop brought together almost 100 participants from city, county, state, federal and tribal agencies. This webinar will summarize the content presented during the one-day workshop and will highlight key themes that emerged from the presentations and discussion throughout the day.

    PRESENTERS:
    Lara Whitely Binder | Climate Preparedness Specialist, King County
    Crystal Raymond | Climate Adaptation Specialist, University of Washington Climate Impacts Group

  • A tribal fire crew member in Oregon monitors a prescribed burn, a key tool for preventing large wildfires that are likely to become more common under climate change

    Vulnerability Assessment Resources for Northwest and Great Basin Tribes

    Are you concerned about what climate change might mean for your tribe? This webinar will introduce the Climate Impacts Group’s new Tribal Vulnerability Assessment Resources, designed to support Northwest and Great Basin tribes’ efforts to assess climate risks to natural and cultural resources.

    In this webinar, Dr. Meade Krosby, Senior Scientist at the Climate Impacts Group and University Deputy Director of the NW CASC, will first introduce the Tribal Climate Tool, which provides interactive maps, graphs and reports summarizing projected changes in climate for the unique geographies and impacts of concern to Northwest and Great Basin tribes. This webinar will also introduce the Tribal Climate Vulnerability Resources webpage, developed to orient users to the range of vulnerability assessment approaches and resources available to tribes. Finally, Dr. Krosby will describe the services provided by the Tribal Climate Technical Support Desk, which offers rapid response to tribal queries about the vulnerability assessment process.

    The University of Washington Climate Impacts Group, in close collaboration with tribal partners, developed the Tribal Vulnerability Assessment Resources through the NW CASC and GBLCC-funded project “Building Tribal Capacity to Assess Vulnerability to Climate Change.”

    PRESENTER:
    Meade Krosby | Deputy University Director, Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center & Senior Scientist, University of Washington Climate Impacts Group



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